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Nanotechnology: the future of healthcare
November 18 2013 0 comment

Nanotechnology: the future of healthcare

We’ve been hearing about nanotechnology for a while now, but it still seems a long way off. However, recent advancements in nanotechnology could revolutionize the healthcare and medical device industry, and change the landscape of healthcare delivery forever. Nanotechnology, the science of extremely small materials, holds the key to improving healthcare, from delivering drugs more effectively to providing better patient care and much more. You’re truly missing out if you’re not taking advantage of this groundbreaking innovation. Here’s how nanotechnology could change healthcare for the better.

Nanotechnology and cancer

The traditional method for curing cancer is chemotherapy, whereby patients take certain drugs to kill cancer cells before they spread. The powerful medication circulates in the bloodstream and directly damages the cancer cells that are growing and multiplying. But chemotherapy has the unfortunate side effect of also killing regular cells, which makes patients extremely sick and susceptible to other ailments.

Through the use of magnetic nanoparticles in a miniature resonance sensor, doctors are able to detect cancer early, increasing the patient’s chance of survival. Scientists have started using nanotechnology to devise a highly specific method of killing cancer cells. The process involves inserting nanotubes into cancer cells and exposing the tissue to laser light, heating up the nanotubes and killing the cancer cells while leaving the healthy cells unharmed.

Nanotechnology and brain disorders

Nanotechnology has made it possible for researchers to collect in-depth data on the human brain. By using nano-scale diamond particles, the brain’s activities are converted into frequencies of light that can be registered by external sensors, allowing researchers to study the brain in much greater detail.

With a microscopic size of just a billionth of a millimeter, nanoparticles are able to cross the blood brain barrier and access the brain’s remote areas. They have also shown tremendous potential in being a useful alternative to diagnosing and treating neurodegenerative diseases.

Nanotechnology and diagnostics

Nanotechnology has the potential to revolutionize the way we collect medical data. Doctors are able to distribute nano-scale diagnostic devices throughout the body in order to detect chemical changes on the spot. This allows for real-time tracking of a patient’s health status.

Diagnosis techniques based on nanotechnology also provide several advantages, including complete diagnosis and treatment with just one visit to the doctor, rather than needing multiple follow-up visits. Another benefit is the accurate and early detection of diseases, which allows doctors to potentially stop diseases before they can cause more damage to the patient.

Want to learn how you can implement nanotechnology into your medical practices? Drop us a line today and get advice from our experts.

Published with permission from TechAdvisory.org. Source.
Avoid these data visualization errors
November 01 2013 0 comment

Avoid these data visualization errors

One of the best ways to present complex business data and reports is visualization. Good data visualization can significantly help users to take in a vast amount of information in a short period of time. But of course, not everyone is a data visualization expert, which is why much of the visual content we see nowadays is often ineffective and jam-packed with information. If you’re looking to create great data visualization that appeals to readers, make sure to avoid these data visualization pitfalls.

Inconsistent visualizations

It’s important to be consistent when presenting your data, otherwise users will have to stop and figure out how to read each new picture before they can comprehend what it says, wasting time and defeating the purpose of data visualization. Luckily, there are some best practices you can follow. For instance, try choosing colors that go well together. Use only 2-3 colors at most throughout your visualization - any more and you’ll find that your pictures might be hard to read. Also, use the same iconography and typography in each picture so your audience can quickly understand the information.

Displaying too much data

Overly complicated data visualizations are sure to turn off most audiences because they can’t figure out where and what to focus on. Your customers, colleagues, and employers want specific, relevant answers. The quicker you can deliver those answers, the better. Irrelevant data gives your presentation a cluttered look, making finding relevant information more difficult for readers. The solution? Find a compromise between showing too much data and not showing enough overall. Use good judgement.

Oversimplifying data

The purpose of data visualization is to present data in a way that’s easy to understand. While it’s all too easy to simplify data, if you go too far and leave out crucial parts, your audiences won’t be able to see or grasp the main point of the presentation. Instead of trying to oversimplify data, it’s better to include all important criteria and organize them into a structure so audiences can easily understand what’s being presented to them.

Choosing the wrong visualization

This is one of the most common mistakes made in data visualization. There are many different types of data out there, and each of those types require different analytics and tools to use. For example, if you want to present a sales growth comparison in the last 5 years, it’s better to use bar charts that can clearly show the difference at a glance. If you want to show a relationship between two metrics, on the other hand, you should use a scatter chart to show results.

The best way to avoid all these errors is to focus on your goals first. It’s likely that you’ll have to make changes along the way, which is actually a good thing, because it will make your presentation more accurate and effective.

Want to learn more about other business intelligence tools to implement in your company? Give us a call today.

Published with permission from TechAdvisory.org. Source.

 

Securing healthcare data
October 22 2013 0 comment

Securing healthcare data

Healthcare institutions today are increasingly opting for mobile devices to increase their employees’ productivity and collaboration, and to deliver better patient care and customer service. Yet the benefits come with the potential risks of data breaches and threats. Without proper security measures in place, hackers could steal patients’ healthcare data and use it for personal gains. Protecting patients’ information is a must for your healthcare organization - here’s how you can secure healthcare data.

Encrypt data

Data encryption stops hackers in their tracks of stealing information. When you set up connected device systems with service providers, whether it’s cloud systems or data transfer channels, make sure that data traffic of the device and its software application is encrypted when communicating your institution’s private networks and those of your outsourcing providers’. Personal healthcare information can be compromised during the collection and transmission processes. Encrypt data to protect information from being stolen.

Protect passwords

When setting up a system, connected devices are automatically deployed with default usernames and passwords, most of which are all too familiar for attackers. After setup is complete and before critical information is collected and transmitted, you should change the password immediately. Also, the connected device network shouldn’t be configured in a way that exposes authentication credentials in your institution’s network.

Authorize devices

Privacy protection can be strengthened by securing device and authorizing permissions. The devices should be configured to prevent data from being accessed or removed by all others except the authorized device holders. Restrict devices from accessing data beyond its intended operation, and set up permissions so that the generated data can only be accessed by an authorized person with a need to handle the information.

Inspect personnels

One of the loopholes in healthcare data security lies in employees. Former employees - both of your healthcare institution, vendors and its subcontractors - can be the source of unauthorized disclosure. Check for potential data breaches regularly, detect and repair the damage before it spreads. Additionally, issue security policies and watch over your current employees to ensure good personnel practice. This is especially important at the network administrator level, since that manager holds the key to your healthcare data.

As a healthcare business owner you should enter into agreements with your IT service provider to ensure the connected devices and network system is up-to-date and protected by multiple layers of security.

If you want to learn how to protect your healthcare institution from hackers, get in touch with us today - our cybersecurity experts are on hands to help.

Published with permission from TechAdvisory.org. Source.

 

A metric more important than website traffic
October 04 2013 0 comment

A metric more important than website traffic

Are you getting a large amount of traffic to your site but not seeing a corresponding match in product or service sales? This is a head-scratching dilemma that many small business owners will face at one time or another. The reason behind it can be summed up in one word: engagement. A high amount of visitors doesn’t necessarily translate into engaged customers. Here’s how you can use Google Analytics to change that.

How do you measure engagement?

Just because a page receives a large amount of traffic, doesn’t mean it has quality content on it that visitors value. Half of the visitors to your most trafficked blog post or service page can easily bounce within seconds. So to figure out which pages your customers like, you need to measure engagement. And the easiest way to do that is by looking at the amount of time a visitor spends on a page.

Generally speaking, if a visitor is on a page for five minutes or more, they’re likely reading, watching or listening to some form of content you posted. Of course there’s the off chance that maybe he or she took an extended bathroom break after landing on your page or forgot to close it and continued surfing the web in another window. But if a consistent number of visitors are spending several minutes on a given page, you can feel confident that most of them are engaging with the content.

Why does engagement matter?

Simple. The more your visitors engage with your content, the more likely they’ll visit your website again or - even better - become a loyal customer.

You can measure engagement by following these four steps in Google Analytics:

1. Track engagement over a long period of time

We’re not just talking a month or two, but more like years. This will show you which pages are performing best in the long run. To do this, open Google Analytics. Then in the top right corner of the screen, input your date range and then click Apply.

2. Measure all pages

You need to look at time spent on all your pages to see what’s performing best. In the navigation bar to the left of your screen, click on the following in the order below:

  1. Behavior
  2. Site Content
  3. All Pages

3. Compare the average time visitors spend on a page

Under the main graph that displays visitor numbers to your site, you'll see a search box with the word “advanced” next to it. To the right of that, you'll see five buttons. Click on the second button from the right - the Comparison button. To be sure you’re clicking on the correct one, hover your mouse over it and the word “comparison” will pop up.

Slightly below the comparison button and to the left, choose Average time on page as your secondary metric.

4. Mind the Green bars

After you’ve followed the above steps, green bars will appear to the right of some of the pages displayed. The higher the bar, the greater amount of time a visitor is spending on a page.

With this data at your disposal, now you can understand what content your customers find valuable - and then focus on creating more of it.

Want to know more about how to gain valuable insights from your business data? Give us a call today.

Published with permission from TechAdvisory.org. Source.

 

Avoid these business continuity mistakes
September 18 2013 0 comment

Avoid these business continuity mistakes

In the event of a disaster, businesses must make sure their servers, data and critical documents are safe and secure. But that’s not all, for it is essential that you ensure the security and peace of mind of your most valuable asset — your employees. With that in mind, here are five business continuity mistakes to steer clear of in order to ensure your organization will live to tell the tale.

Mistake #1: Assuming your employees will be there to support you

Companies that survive unexpected incidents are the ones that thought about their employees’ needs. It is important that your management team are aware of the business continuity plan’s SWOT analysis, which examines the strengths, weaknesses, opportunities and threats you face in a disaster. Review and obtain formal management sign-off on the SWOT analysis and have your management team make decisions in advance about actions that require expenditure.

Review decisions on paying all employees during a period of business interruption for a minimum period of time. Communicate your strategy and message to your employees to let them know that you will be there to support them and their families in the event of a crisis. This way, your employees will have peace of mind knowing you and the company are there for them, and in turn they will be there to support you.

Mistake #2: Using only words, not actions

Once you have your business continuity plan documented and your SWOT signed off, you need to think about the small stuff to ensure your plan is executable. This includes logistical considerations like food, travel and living requirements, medical aid and monetary support.

Walk the walk and ensure your medical providers have made arrangements in advance. Have an Employee Assistance Program (EAP) in place to make sure your employees have access to people who can give them support in the event of an incident. Staff will remember if you provided them with care and support, and will remember even more clearly if you didn’t.

Mistake #3: Not showing your employees how the plan will work

While many business owners worry about downtime, they overlook the fact that explaining the plan and its execution to employees is critical to minimizing lost productivity.

As part of your maintenance program, include your employees as well as your security, medical and EAP team in the testing process. Execute a live test where various providers can demonstrate their capability to support your employees. This way, your employees will know that you care and can have faith you will be able to support them when the tables have turned.

Mistake #4: Not dealing with your employees first

When an incident occurs, the first assessment most businesses make is to determine the impact it has on the company. But how do you execute that process without people? When disaster strikes, your employees will naturally want to be taking care of their families, not your business.

Ensure your crisis management team addresses the people issues first. Where are they? What do I need to do for them? Are there any special employee needs I must address? After having accomplished this, you gain the ability to show your people that you’re in control and that you truly care.

Mistake #5: Reacting rather than communicating

In the event of a disaster, the most important thing to get right is communication. It is imperative that your employees know you can provide them with the most up-to-date information.

Set up a toll-free hotline so your employees can call in for regular updates, or create an open forum where your employees can tell you what you could have done better and what failed. With that, you provide consistent messaging and you can eliminate second-hand information and employee guesswork, while gaining insight into what could have been improved.

If your business continuity plan takes into account that your employees are your biggest assets, you’ll have peace of mind knowing the core of your organization is still standing strong even if the worst should happen.

Looking to learn more about business continuity and how it can help your business? Contact us today and see how we can help.

Published with permission from TechAdvisory.org. Source.
VoIP call comes to Facebook Messenger
September 02 2013 0 comment

VoIP call comes to Facebook Messenger

Voice over Internet Protocol (VoIP) is one of the latest innovations in the communications industry. It replaces your traditional landline phone with one that connects over the Internet, allowing you to make local and long-distance calls for a low cost. Many companies are jumping on the VoIP bandwagon, including Facebook. In an attempt to transform its mobile messaging service into a full-featured platform, Facebook has featured a VoIP video calling function in its Messenger app. Here’s a recap on the social media giant’s big step.

Facebook first introduced desktop video calling in partnership with Skype in 2011. But now, with the launch of video calling in Facebook Messenger, there’s no doubt that Facebook and Skype have parted ways.

Today, Messenger has approximately 600 million users, and the new video chat feature will likely reel in even more people. Messenger already offers people the ability to make voice calls around the world, and video calling will expand its real-time communication features. This will enable people to reach out to others whenever and wherever, making Messenger’s video calling function a powerful tool.

How it works

Video calling in Messenger will be available today for iOS and Android users in most parts of the world, with more regions to be added in the coming months. The new video chat feature is simple to use. You simply engage a conversation with a friend in Messenger, and tap the camera icon at the top of the screen to start video calling. The call uses your phone’s front camera by default, but you can also switch to the back camera when you want to show off your surroundings to your correspondent.

Connectivity

Messenger will adjust the quality of your video call according to your Internet connection. Facebook will notify you if the connection weakens to a point where video won’t work, and you can simply switch to audio VoIP. What’s more, it’s free! You will only be charged for data use by your mobile operator, which you can avoid by using a Wi-Fi connection. The one thing that sets Messenger’s video calling apart from its competitors is the way it allows you to turn off your video feed to increase the other person’s video quality. This way you can give your friends extra bandwidth if what matters is you seeing their surroundings, not them seeing yours. The Messenger team has made an enormous effort to try crunch the data needed for video calling to make it as small as possible. So despite an imperfect mobile connection, Messenger’s voice and video quality will remain strong.

What next?

The current VoIP video calling feature of Messenger is in its early stages of development. Messenger only allows one on one video calls at the moment, but Facebook may develop and add group conference calling in the near future. The tech team is also working on a bunch of secondary features to expand Messenger’s capabilities and to improve the user experience.

Overall, Messenger’s new video calling feature is a great addition from Facebook. It allows for spontaneous conversations rather than scheduled occurrences. People can text messages to each other in Messenger, then switch to video call with one tap - it’s that simple.

Effective communication is also important for businesses. If you’re looking for VoIP solutions to simplify your company’s communications, contact us today - our tech experts can help.

Published with permission from TechAdvisory.org. Source.